Corn Chowder

Corn Chowder

IMG_6250

As you once again may have noticed, it has been a long time since I’ve posted. And I have a confession to make, I really don’t want to write this post. Ignoring my blog has really been the metaphorical monkey on my back lately and it was only over the past few days that I really figured out why…

When I started writing this blog my intention was to keep it only as a diary. A place where I could document, which photos if applicable, the different food missions I created and served. There are a few things I’ve made (entire Chinese food take out dinner from SCRATCH) that I truly wished I had documented (and real life proof!) I’ve cooked. It was a home for my favourite recipes, and for me. Know one not even my family knew about it.

It wasn’t really until a year ago that I started telling my friends and family about my little project. I got my own domain name and started putting some time and effort (and money) into my project. A few months later I was contacted by an amazing group the Halifax Food Bloggers and my blog started to develop into something other people were enjoying.

I’ll admit… at first I liked the attention, I liked how each week my hits grew and I could tell more and more people were checking out what I was cooking… I’m a perfectionist, I heard about an (awesome) food photography class and signed up. I wanted to make my blog look better and my recipes look better and keep the feedback growing… I learned all about the basics of lighting, and how to make your photos look better and how to ACTUALLY KNOW what a good photo is supposed to look like…

And the more I knew, the more critical of my photos I became… And suddenly I was beginning to feel like none of my photos were good enough for my blog. I created great dreams of going back and recreating recipes and displays and making my food look as wonderful as it tastes…. And as my fridge started piling up with one serving dishes… It started to feel like a burden…

My friends will tell you… I’m good at making things taste good. I am not good at making things look nice. I will throw it on a plate and really have no cares or preference for presentation. I find plating food and the art of presentation stressful. I was becoming really critical of my photos. Suddenly blogging was a stress and not something I enjoyed any more….

So I decided this week it has to stop!

I will still ever so often get my camera out and really sit down and tinker and try to make my photos look nice… But at the end of the day, I like to cook and I like to share, the photos, the presentation and the story will always come second. I blog because I like the diary and I like the convenience of being able to find the recipes I’ve made before. So going forward I may sometimes or often have shitty food pictures, and that, is something I’m very ok with. 🙂

 

Corn Chowder

Corn Chowder

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • 2 medium sized leeks, cleaned and chopped
  • 2 gloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 c. finely chopped colored peppers
  • 2 c. diced potatoes
  • 1/4. c. dry white wine
  • 6-8 c. corn kernels (preferably off the cob), divided
  • 2-3 c. water or stock.
  • 1-2 c. milk
  • 1/2-1 c. cream

Instructions

  1. In a large stock pot melt the butter over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook until fragrant 2-3 minutes. Add the potatoes and chopped peppers and 1-2 tbps of olive oil as needed to prevent the vegetables from sticking to the bottom of the pan.
  2. Cook the vegetables stirring every 3-4 minutes to prevent vegetables from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Season with a bit of salt and pepper but not too much, especially if you used salted butter.
  3. Cook the vegetables for about 20 minutes or until the potatoes start to break down. Meanwhile, puree half of the corn in a food processor until it becomes a pulp.
  4. Once the potatoes have begun to break down, deglaze the pan with the white wine. Add the white wine to the pan and cook until the smell of alcohol is gone from the steam and most of the liquid has evaporated.
  5. Add the pureed corn to the pot and stir to incorporate.
  6. Add the water or stock, and add the whole kernels of corn, and bring to a simmer. Mixture will be quite thick. Simmer the corn for a 4-5 minutes to allow the corn to cook.
  7. Add the cream (as much as you’d like to use) and thin out with milk to desired consistency. If you would prefer not to use dairy you can use water or stock to bring to desired consistency although it will be more runny and less creamy. Heat the chowder until it reaches the ideal temperature.
  8. Taste, and adjust with salt and pepper if necessary.
http://www.constantvessel.com/corn-chowder/

The secret to this corn chowder is to puree half of the corn kernels in the food processor before adding them to the soup to help make it thick without tonnes of cream or thicker. In fact you could opt out of dairy and just thicken this with stock and corn puree… but the dairy definitely makes it better.

Local corn is at the end of it’s season (tear *) and often is woody and shriveled on the cob. This is an excellent way of using the last of the corn for a final bowl of corny goodness.

Ingredients

serves 8 large bowls

2 tbsp butter

Olive oil, as needed

2 medium sized leeks, cleaned and chopped

2 gloves of garlic, minced

1 c. finely chopped colored peppers

2 c. diced potatoes

1/4. c. dry white wine

6-8 c. corn kernels (preferably off the cob), divided

2-3 c. water or stock.

1-2 c. milk

1/2-1 c. cream

Instructions

In a large stock pot melt the butter over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook until fragrant 2-3 minutes. Add the potatoes and chopped peppers and 1-2 tbps of olive oil as needed to prevent the vegetables from sticking to the bottom of the pan.

Cook the vegetables stirring every 3-4 minutes to prevent vegetables from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Season with a bit of salt and pepper but not too much, especially if you used salted butter.

Cook the vegetables for about 20 minutes or until the potatoes start to break down. Meanwhile, puree half of the corn in a food processor until it becomes a pulp.

Once the potatoes have begun to break down, deglaze the pan with the white wine. Add the white wine to the pan and cook until the smell of alcohol is gone from the steam and most of the liquid has evaporated.

Add the pureed corn to the pot and stir to incorporate.

IMG_6233

Add the water or stock, and add the whole kernels of corn, and bring to a simmer. Mixture will be quite thick. Simmer the corn for a 4-5 minutes to allow the corn to cook.

Add the cream (as much as you’d like to use) and thin out with milk to desired consistency. If you would prefer not to use dairy you can use water or stock to bring to desired consistency although it will be more runny and less creamy. Heat the chowder until it reaches the ideal temperature.

IMG_6234

Taste, and adjust with salt and pepper if necessary.

 

 

 

9 comments on “Corn ChowderAdd yours →

  1. Brianna, I always enjoy reading your posts, I like to hear about your adventures in the kitchen and beyond. Your voice, point of view, and your recipes keep me coming back.
    Don’t let the photos get in your way, your blog is awesome, it never fails to inspire. Nobody cares about the foodporn when the content is so good. That’s what I think anyway.
    Beth

  2. Brianna,

    I agree with Beth, your recipes speak for themselves! I have made a bunch of them and taken pretty photos (I love food porn, and I’m one of “those” people on Instagram, constantly posting photos of my food). I wouldn’t worry at all about perfecting your photographs because you already have a reputation for being a genius in the kitchen, but if you wanted you could ask your readers who’ve made a recipe or two to send you theirs.

    Keep the recipes comin!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.