How to make Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce

So now that you’ve made Chipotle Peppers, by smoking jalapeno peppers on the BBQ,  you’re thinking “what am I going to do with all these dried chipotles?”. Yes! We’ve prolonged the shelf life, and you can put them in a jar or zipper bag and crush them up or rehydrate them when needed – but when I usually use chipotle peppers, it’s chipotle peppers in adobo sauce. And they are not the cheapest things at the store and sometimes difficult to find – so why not make them yourself?

I am not ashamed to say that I borrowed this recipe from someone who seemed to know what they were doing. I used a recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table where she has information and knowledge about the different varieties of jalapeno peppers and how they differ. Both of these things are news to me although they really should not be. Of course there are different types of jalapenos and they all make different types of smoked peppers. But since I brushed 2 fresh inches of snow off my car this morning (and that’s only the beginning) I’m just happy to find any jalapeno that was grown locally in abundance.

Here are the instructions on how I made my chipotle peppers in adobo sauce. Slightly modified from Pati’s version.

How to make Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Yield: 5 cups

Ingredients

  • 4 c. dried chipotle peppers
  • 2 fresh anaheim peppers, seeded and washed
  • 1 lbs of tomatoes
  • 1 c. olive oil
  • 3 medium carrots, sliced and washed
  • 1 white onion, halved and sliced
  • 6 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1/2 tsp dried savory
  • 2-3 sprigs dried thyme
  • 3/4 c. light brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • 3/4 c. white vinegar
  • 3/4 c. cider vinegar

Instructions

  1. Rinse, drain and stem the chipotle peppers. Place them in a medium saucepan and fill with 2-3 cups of water. The chipotle’s will float, so you want there to be enough water in the pot that you can dunk them under. Set over medium-high heat. Once simmering, cook for 15 minutes, and turn off heat.
  2. Stem and seed the anaheim pepper and the tomatoes and cut them into 3-4 pieces each. Place them in a different pot and place enough water into the pot so the tomatoes are mostly covered. Simmer until the tomatoes are softened and cooked through, 7-8 minutes. Transfer the tomatoes and peppers to a blender with 1 cup of the cooking water and puree until smooth.
  3. In a deep frying pan or a dutch oven, heat the olive oil until it is hot but not smoking. Stir in the carrots and onions, and allow them to sweat for 2-3 minutes. Make a hole in the center of the dish, and add the garlic and allow it to cook 1-2 minutes before stirring to incorporate it in with the carrots and onions.
  4. Pour in the anaheim chili and tomato puree, savory, thyme, salt and sugar. Stir. And let simmer and allow to thicken for 5 minutes.
  5. Add the vinegars and stir. Add 1.5 cups of the chipotle steeping water. The more you add the longer it will take for the water to evaporate but it will leave all of the spiciness behind in the pot.
  6. Simmer the pot over medium low, until the sauce is a desired consistency. For me this was about 1 hour.
  7. Transfer the sauce to the blender and puree until smooth.
  8. Add drained rehydrated chipotles into the sauce, and jar, freeze or store in the fridge for up to 6 months.
http://www.constantvessel.com/how-to-make-chipotle-peppers-in-adobo-sauce/

Ingredients

4 c. dried chipotle peppers

2 fresh anaheim peppers, seeded and washed

1 lbs of tomatoes

1 c. olive oil

3 medium carrots, sliced and washed

1 white onion, halved and sliced

6 garlic cloves, sliced

1/2 tsp dried savory

2-3 sprigs dried thyme

3/4 c. light brown sugar

1 tbsp kosher salt

3/4 c. white vinegar

3/4 c. cider vinegar

Instructions

Rinse, drain and stem the chipotle peppers. Place them in a medium saucepan and fill with 2-3 cups of water. The chipotle’s will float, so you want there to be enough water in the pot that you can dunk them under. Set over medium-high heat. Once simmering, cook for 15 minutes, and turn off heat.

Stem and seed the anaheim pepper and the tomatoes and cut them into 3-4 pieces each. Place them in a different pot and place enough water into the pot so the tomatoes are mostly covered. Simmer until the tomatoes are softened and cooked through, 7-8 minutes. Transfer the tomatoes and peppers to a blender with 1 cup of the cooking water and puree until smooth.

In a deep frying pan or a dutch oven, heat the olive oil until it is hot but not smoking. Stir in the carrots and onions, and allow them to sweat for 2-3 minutes. Make a hole in the center of the dish, and add the garlic and allow it to cook 1-2 minutes before stirring to incorporate it in with the carrots and onions.

Pour in the anaheim chili and tomato puree, savory, thyme, salt and sugar. (Original recipe also calls for bay leaves which I was out of – darn!) Stir. And let simmer and allow to thicken for 5 minutes.

Add the vinegars and stir. At this point I tasted it and decided it was much too sweet for me. I decided to add the chipotle steeping water into the pot. I added about 1.5 cups. The more you add the longer it will take for the water to evaporate but it will leave all of the spiciness behind in the pot.

Simmer the pot over medium low, until the sauce is a desired consistency. For me this was about 1 hour.

Transfer the sauce to the blender and puree until smooth. (This is not traditional).

Add drained rehydrated chipotles into the sauce, and jar, freeze or store in the fridge for up to 6 months.

 

When I tasted this sauce, I thought it was way too sweet. I was disappointed because I didn’t think this was what adobo sauce should be like. But that same evening, about an hour later, I was watching the food network, and a chef in a Mexican restuarant was making his own adobo sauce. He added fermented pineapples in water (his grandmother’s recipe I’d love to get my hands on that!) but he added sugar in about the same ratio. (although it was Mexican sugar). He also added Mexican cinnamon into the pot which might be an interesting thing to try next time.

 

 

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