Citrus Striped Bass en papillote

Citrus Striped Bass en papillote

After talking with another #hfxfb (Halifax Food Blogger) today it is reassuring…

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After talking with another #hfxfb (Halifax Food Blogger) today it is reassuring to know that I am not the only one who has many half written posts that are delayed with their appearance into social media. I guess it makes sense though knowing we all eat and all probably cook more delicious things then we could ever want to post (I know I do). This dish was cooked very shortly after the fishing adventure post but as you can see has taken forever to make it’s appearance. It is super easy to make, and cooking anything “en papillote” is beyond simple.

Egg Salad Sandwich

Egg Salad Sandwich

I love eggs salad. Eggs salad on it’s own, egg salad on…

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I love eggs salad. Eggs salad on it’s own, egg salad on sandwiches, there is not time that I don’t love egg salad. Supreme egg salad with tones of things tossed into the mix, or basic egg salad sandwich with nothing but eggs, mayo and white bread. After one customer’s suggestion at the farmer’s market, regarding pea shoots on egg salad, I had been craving this ever since.

Roasted Maple Glazed Carrots

Roasted Maple Glazed Carrots

The carrots you see pictured here are called Heritage Carrots, and the…

Roasted Maple Glazed Carrots

The carrots you see pictured here are called Heritage Carrots, and the best way to describe them is “this is what carrots looked like 100 years ago before we bred them to be orange”. Not to be confused with GM, people began early on using specific seeds or breeding specific animals to produce certain offspring. For carrots this meant that farmers focused on saving seeds from the orange varieties, but carrots used to grow in an assortment of colors including white and purple.

Pho

Pho

PrintPho IngredientsTo Make the Broth 2 large onions – split in half…

Pho

Ingredients

    To Make the Broth
  • 2 large onions – split in half
  • 1 – 6″ piece of ginger – split in half lengthwise
  • 3 lbs beef shin bones
  • 1.5 lbs boneless beef chuck
  • 1 lbs brisket
  • 3 whole star anise
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1/4 cup + seasoning of fish sauce
  • To Serve
  • 6-8 servings of pho noodles
  • 1 lbs beef flank steak – thinly sliced against the grain
  • 2 cups cilantro
  • 3-4 cups mung bean sprouts
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
  • thinly sliced thai chilies
  • 2 limes cut into wedges
  • 1 small carrot, thinly sliced

Instructions

    Preparing the Broth
  1. Adjust the oven rack to 3-4″ from the broiler and set to high. Place your split onion and ginger on a rimmed baking sheet and put on the rack to char the garlic and onion.
  2. Broil ginger and onion turning occassionally until evenly charred on all surfaces. Approx 25 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine all meat for broth (shins, chuck and brisket) in a large pot. Cover with cool water and bring to a boil over high heat, boiling for 15 minutes.
  4. Dump the meat and water into the sink. When cool enough to handle, rinse the parts under cool water carefully scrubbing the debris off from any bones and cracks in the meat, then return them to the pot and recover with cool water.
  5. Add the charred onions, ginger, anise, cinnamon, fennel, cloves, coriander and fish sauce. Bring to a boil over high heat and reduce to a bar simmer. Cook, stirring occassionally, until brisket falls apart, about 1.5 hours. Remove brisket and chuck from the pot.
  6. Continue simmering the broth for 4 hours, topping up with water as necessary. Strain broth through a fine mesh strainer.
  7. Disguard bones, tissues and aromatics. Return the broth to the pot.
  8. Carefully skim off the fat from the surface and discard. Season to taste with fish sauce. Return the broth to a boil over medium heat.
  9. To Serve
  10. Place noodle portion in each bowl. Add flank steak at this time or after broth is added.
  11. Spoon hot broth over the noodles in the bowl.
  12. Add additional toppings as desired.
  13. Season with additional fish sauce, hoisin or sriracha as desired.
http://www.constantvessel.com/pho/

The most difficult part of making Pho is pronouncing it. The proper pronunciation is in fact “fuh” but I was introduced to this Vietnamese noodle dish with the pronunciation “foh” – just how it looks. Anyone who’s ever had pho knows that it’s all in the broth. Seriouseats.com did a “food lab” and produced a recipe to make your own pho as well as the science behind it. The food lab can be found here and the original recipe can be found here.

Chicken Dinner on a Weeknight

Chicken Dinner on a Weeknight

I was cooking dinner for a friend who’d been away working for…

I was cooking dinner for a friend who’d been away working for the past 6 weeks. When I asked him what he wanted he said “anything that wasn’t restaurant food”. I couldn’t think of anything more homey and delicious then a roasted chicken BUT it was a Monday night. I wasn’t going home from work on a Monday and cooking a whole chicken. I used boneless skinless chicken thighs, almost always, because they have more fat and stay more moist then chicken breast. Since I didn’t have time to brine, I used some left over bacon I had to keep things moist and leftover fall veggies to make it a one pot dish!